Narrative Transport. The official Michael Pryor website.

March16th

 


I took a break from my latest Work In Progress and started thinking about how I could save the planet. As you do.

I swivelled away from the computer, hands behind my head, tossing up between instituting a utopian regime and formulating a plan to maximise innate human potential without our developing those really huge craniums when my gaze landed on the bookshelf in my study. That’s when I realised that, in many ways, I’m already doing my part in saving the world.

You see, with the accepted science pointing out that we have an unfortunate rise in Carbon Dioxide levels and that these increased levels are responsible for an accelerating Greenhouse Effect which is bumping up global temperatures with some decidedly nasty outcomes waiting for us, it behoves us all to do something about reducing the amount of Carbon Dioxide floating around and doing its best to make us all miserable.

That’s why we have all this talk about Carbon trading and Carbon Offsets and Carbon Sequestration – which is where I see my greatest contribution coming to the fore.

Carbon sequestration is generally thought of as pumping vast volumes of Carbon Dioxide into underground reservoirs, but it can mean locking up carbon in many ways – just so long as it doesn’t break down and become CO2 in the atmosphere.

My answer? Gazing at my bookshelf, there it is. Books. Books are made of paper. Paper is made of trees. Trees are made of carbon (mostly). If we burn trees, that’s bad because it releases carbon. If the trees rot, it releases carbon (bad). But making the paper into books which sit on shelves all neat and protected, well, that’s locking up all that carbon for hundreds of years. It sits there, unspoiled, a handy carbon sink for posterity. Every book is helping, every shelf. Every library is a vast world-saving lock-up, doing its best to keep up from the devastating effects of world-wide Climate Change.

Think about it. Buy books and save the planet. It’s your duty to do so.

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1 Comment

  • Comment by Kathryn — March 21, 2014 @ 2:36 pm

    A very entertaining read!
    Just another reason why books are so brilliant.

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