Narrative Transport. The official Michael Pryor website.
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  • February25th

    I’m extremely pleased to note that ‘The Laws of Magic’ series has been shortlisted for the inaugural Sara Douglass Book Series Award.

    all covers in a strip small

    From the Aurealis Awards website:

    This Award is named for one of Australia’s best known speculative fiction writers. Sara Douglass was the flagship author of the HarperVoyager Australian line, which launched the careers of many of our most popular writers, and paved the way for the vibrant and diverse speculative fiction scene Australia has today. Sara’s contribution to the state of speculative fiction in Australia cannot be underestimated, and we are proud to commemorate her in this Award.

    Needless to say, this is a great honour, and one that would have been impossible without the inestimable folk at Random House Australia and, in particular, ace editor Zoe Walton.

    The shortlists for the other Aurealis Awards can be found here. The award ceremony will be held on Friday 25 March.

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  • July3rd

     

    montage of all covers small

    At last – I’m excited to let you know that the entire The Laws of Magic series is now available as audiobooks!

    The fine people at Audible have turned the adventures of Aubrey, George, Caroline and Sophie into quality audio texts, and you’ll find them here:

    Blaze of Glory

    Heart of Gold

    Word of Honour

    Time of Trial

    Moment of Truth

    Hour of Need

    The books are read by the very talented Rupert Degas and here’s his bio:

    Rupert Degas can be heard reading True History of the Kelly Gang, PS I Love You, If You Could See Me Now, Lord Loss, Demon Thief, Slawter, and The Saga of Darren Shan. He is also the voice of Pantalaimon in Philip Pullman’s Northern Lights. He has lent his voice to numerous cartoons, including Mr Bean, Robotboy, and Bob the Builder and has performed in over thirty radio productions, including The Gemini Apes, The Glittering Prizes, and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. He spent eighteen months in the West End performing in the comedy Stones in his Pockets. He has also read A Wild Sheep Chase and The Wind-up Bird Chronicle for Naxos AudioBooks.

    He does a superb job.

    To help celebrate this audio launch, I’m giving away complete sets of the entire Laws of Magic audio series.  Just go to my contact page, scroll down to the contact form, leave your details and send me a message with the subject ‘LoM audio‘. I’ll run this promotion until the end of July. If you’re a winner, you’ll hear from me.

    Happy listening – and for more about The Laws of Magic, why don’t you spend some time at The Laws of Magic section of my website, with background, musings, and extra material!

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  • November10th

     

    WoH audio book

    At last – The Laws of Magic is now appearing as audiobooks!

    The fine people at Audible are turning the adventures of Aubrey, George, Caroline and Sophie into quality audio texts. The first to be released is Word of Honour and the books will be read by the very talented Rupert Degas.

     

    Here’s his bio:

    Rupert Degas can be heard reading True History of the Kelly Gang, PS I Love You, If You Could See Me Now, Lord Loss, Demon Thief, Slawter, and The Saga of Darren Shan. He is also the voice of Pantalaimon in Philip Pullman’s Northern Lights. He has lent his voice to numerous cartoons, including Mr Bean, Robotboy, and Bob the Builder and has performed in over thirty radio productions, including The Gemini Apes, The Glittering Prizes, and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. He spent eighteen months in the West End performing in the comedy Stones in his Pockets. He has also read A Wild Sheep Chase and The Wind-up Bird Chronicle for Naxos AudioBooks.

    And he does a splendid job with Word of Honour.

    To help celebrate this audio launch, I have some copies of the audio Word of Honour to give away. Just go to my contact page, scroll down to the contact form, and send me a message with the subject ‘WoH audio’. I’ll run this promotion until the end of November.

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  • May17th

    Reader feedback time: a recent fan letter dictionaryloved the Laws of Magic partly because it ‘has me looking up words very page? (which is what I absolutely love about your books)’.

    Finding the right language level is a crucial aspect of writing for young people, but I maintain that this doesn’t have to mean dumbing down. In fact, as my young reader pointed out, encountering an extended vocabulary can be part of the joy of reading.

    Writing in a quasi-Edwardian mode, as in the Laws of Magic and The Extraordinaires series has given me licence to indulge one of my great loves – words. The old fashioned settings allow me to use words that simply wouldn’t be appropriate if I were writing in the here and now – and it encourages me to use the subjunctive, as I just did in this sentence. Read More | Comments

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  • September10th

    In 2003, I wrote the first draft of what was to become Blaze of Glory, the first book in my Laws of Magic series. As I was writing, I was perplexed by how difficult it was. It’s not that I expect writing a 100,000 word novel to be easy but I was having unaccustomed trouble with the characters and the general tone of the prose. When I read the finished draft carefully, I thought long and hard, and then rewrote it from scratch – changing the point of view from first person to third.

    I was only three or four paragraphs into the rewrite when it came alive in a way that my first version hadn’t. The story moved more quickly, I had elbow room, I was able to use irony in a way that I couldn’t with the first person approach – and the main character emerged in a much more rounded way.

    Writing is largely a matter of trial and error. This 100,000 word trial – and error – taught me the importance of using the right point of view for the right story. Get it wrong, and everything else is a struggle.

    Choosing a point of view to write from is one of the two fundamental decisions that a writer must make when beginning a story. To determine the Point of View (POV), you have to decide who is going to be telling the story – who is the narrator. This will both limit and enable your story to unfold. It will present you with opportunities, burden you with responsibilities and throw obstacles in your path. It will also position your reader to engage with your writing on emotional and intellectual levels. Read More | Comments

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  • August6th

    I’m playing around with writing an adult novel – ‘The Laws of Magic’ ten years on. Aubrey, Caroline, George and Sophie in a world startlingly like our own in the Jazz Age, but with magic. Now, I don’t know if this has been done before at all, taking a YA novel and its characters and leaping forward into the adult world.

    I think it has possibilities.

     

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  • December6th

    Here’s a Christmas gift for you: a Laws of Magic 2012 Calendar, suitable for desktop backgrounds.

    LoM calendar 2012

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